Lansons

Lansons Conversations

Is #GE2015 the first truly “social” election?

Obviously the General Election 2015 is the most talked about election in UK history. Things have changed so much in the last five years that it would be unthinkable for e-discussion volumes not to have gone up significantly. We are now in an age where social data-driven headlines are mainstream (see The Telegraph’s Twitter story on last night’s debate). There have also been some interesting insights into voter profiles and topics of conversations across different sets of supporters.

But for me, the answer to my question is “nowhere near as ‘social’ as it could have been”. It seems we’ve missed a big opportunity to engage more young people in the debate through new media and more up-to-date message formation and content distribution techniques. Addressing the growing non-representative nature of our voting sample is a big issue. Following on from Question Time last night, I’m sure this is partly driven by the fact that many people don’t believe a word anyone is saying right now but I think it is also driven by a failure to address younger generations properly.

My view is that there are significant numbers of potential first-time voters out there who are far more interested in the debate than they realise. Adopting the social media principles of relevant content, delivered into a relevant environment, packaged in ways that show how and why their passions are, in fact, linked to politics, might start to address the “so what” factor in this demographic. Whilst the tit for tat spoof videos are quite funny, I can’t imagine they’ve driven anything deeper than momentary amusement for youngsters. There needs to be more “meaningful” content and this blog by James Endersby explores the subject in more detail.

Surely making the debate truly social has to be a better idea than fining people for not turning up!? 

Tweet me with your thoughts @Russler_78.